Category: cats facts

Why do cats like sitting in boxes of all sizes and even bags, drawers and bowls?

Charlie ShortTail

Why does your cat like boxes?

Holly O Purr relaxes in her box.

Understanding why your cat like sitting in a box, bag or drawer.

Charlie ShortTail says : Cats like boxes because:

Cats enjoy a feeling of safety and security when sitting or sleeping in a box.

A box can be lovely and warm –the cardboard provides insulation and cats love warmth.

The ideal temperature for a cat is somewhere around 86-97 degrees or 30-36 oC – our homes are generally cooler than this.

 

Play – cats enjoy hiding and then pouncing on unsuspecting prey or toys, and even other pets or family.

A box provides a good place to watch and observe.

A cardboard box is great to scratch and bite.

Lando sat in this little box to play and also hid his favourite mouse toy in the box.

 

Do not disturb – your cat can sleep or rest and not be bothered by you or others.

Cats sleep for around 18-20 hours per day.

A box can provide stress relief – a sort of getting away from it all.

Research by some scientists seems to show that rescue cats given boxes are able to cope better and adjust to new surroundings quicker.

 

Cats are difficult to study and we still do not know all the reasons why cats love boxes, large, small, tiny and of course drawers, suitcases, handbags, bowls and even shoes.

Leo loves to hide away in a bag.

Holly O Purr sitting pretty in the drawer.

Sources and more detailed information on why cats love boxes.

According to the metro.co.uk

‘Studies collated by Bryan Gardiner at Wired.com have revealed the main reasons behind your cats affinity with boxes.

Firstly, they’re a source of stress-relief. Gardiner cites a recent study by veterinarian Claudia Vinke of Utrecht University in the Netherlands who monitored the stress levels in shelter cats.

After providing hiding boxes for a group of newly arrived domestic cats while depriving another group of them completely, she found a dramatic difference in stress levels between the two groups.

In a nutshell – cats with boxes became accustomed to their new surroundings faster, seemed less stressed faster and sought human company sooner.

Secondly, your cat prefers to flee, rather than fight and a box might represents the perfect shelter from conflict, or just too much attention.’

The ‘Metro’ also refers to ‘The Domestic Cat: The Biology of its Behaviour’ : ‘Cats do not appear to develop conflict resolution strategies to the extent that more gregarious species do, so they may attempt to circumvent agonistic encounters by avoiding others or decreasing their activity.’

An article in Cathealth.com refers to a recent study in the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science found that boxes can actually help reduce a cat’s stress levels.

Reducing stress for new cats  or for shelter cats

A group of new shelter cats were randomly assigned to either receive a box or not. After just a few days, researchers reported that the cats that were given boxes recovered faster and adapted to their environment more quickly than the cats without boxes.

The dailymail.co.uk also states that according to a report by Bryan Gardiner in Wired.com veterinarian Claudia Vinke of Utrecht University in the Netherlands recently studied stress levels in shelter cats. She discovered that cats who had boxes got used to their new surroundings faster than those who didn’t because the boxes acted as a coping mechanism.

Care2.com refers to an article by Steven B Williams /February 9, 2015

Steve writes that: ‘This box-loving aspect of a cat’s personality has long puzzled their human carers, and it’s also caught the attention of scientists. Researchers, who published their findings in Applied Animal Behaviour, investigated whether hiding in boxes might reduce stress for cats in animal shelters.

While most species of dog can adapt to shelter environments relatively quickly, cats often experience high levels of stress. Previous studies have shown that cats prefer areas where they have the ability to hide, but until now scientists have not studied whether so-called “hiding enrichment” might benefit a cat’s sense of well-being and specifically if providing boxes for cats to hide in might help to ease those turbulent first few weeks in a new shelter.

To investigate this, researchers took 19 newly arrived cats in a Dutch animal shelter and randomly split them into two groups, one where the cats would be given access to hiding boxes, and one group who wouldn’t have access. The researchers then observed the cats for 14 days, and they used a scale known as the Kessler and Turner Cat-Stress-Score to estimate, based on visual clues and habits like grooming and eating, how stressed the cats were during this initial settling-in time.

The researchers found that by day three and four there were significant differences in the stress levels exhibited by cats without boxes to those who had boxes, with the cats who had hiding boxes showing a total average stress score lower than their non-box counterparts. An interesting note is that box-access seemed to reduce stress no matter the breed of cat, suggesting that this isn’t just a preference for some but a much more firmly ingrained cat trait.’

Charlie says that a box can be a nice place to relax away from stress and all cats like to feel secure and safe. 

Providing a box or hide-away container can help nervous, new or cats that are in new and strange surroundings.

Charlie would like to thank his furriends Holly, Jo, Lando and Gertie for their gorgeous pictures.

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Can cats and other animals sense and predict earthquakes and other extreme weather events?

Charlie ShortTail

Can cats and dogs predict earthquakes and other extreme weather events?

Charlie thinks  “Yes, cats and dogs can predict earthquakes”

Many owners and some scientists believe that yes, animals do sense changes before an earthquake or extreme weather event.

Animals are more sensitive to electro-magnetic changes in the earth.

Animals may detect high-frequency sounds that are emitted prior to earthquakes and tsunamis.

Animals have been observed to flee before the extreme weather events occur.

According to The Daily Mail (article by Sarah Griffiths) March 2015 ‘animals can predict earthquakes’.

Griffiths states that:

  • Animals CAN predict earthquakes: Scientists document behavioural changes with seismic activity.
  • Scientists filmed the behaviour of animals in Peru before an earthquake and found that many fled to lower ground and holed up days before the event.
  • Expert from Anglia Ruskin University said rodents are extra sensitive.
  • Study suggests animals respond to disturbances in the ionosphere.
  • Positive ions in the air lead to disagreeable side effects in animals.

Earthquake rubble

Can cats and other animals predict earthquakes? The earliest reference of unusual animal behaviour before earthquakes.

There is anecdotal evidence of unusual or bizarre behaviour by animals before an earthquake that dates back to 373 BCE in Greece. (According to the US Geological Survey)

The Greeks observed that rats fled from the city of Helice days before the major earthquake struck.

Animal Planet documents theories about how cats and other animals might sense these impending seismic shifts, including the ability to detect the vibrations that occur before an earthquake, known as primary waves (P waves).

 

What do cats, dogs and other animals sense before earthquakes, tsunamis and extreme weather events?

Cats and other animals are more sensitive to earthquake-related electromagnetic field variations.

Dogs have extraordinary hearing and some scientists think that dogs flee from extreme weather events because they can hear the high-frequency sounds that are caused by earthquakes.

Dogs and other animals survived a Tsunami by fleeing before the event.

tsunami

Why do pets show seemingly bizarre behaviour before earthquakes and extreme weather events?

These behaviours are driven by fear and are part of your pets’ natural survival instincts.

Cats and dogs may start exhibiting odd behaviours anywhere from weeks to seconds before an earthquake hits. Scientists question as to whether this behaviour is due to the weather events or other circumstances.

Pet owners’ may be certain themselves that their cat or dog was displaying very unusual behaviours not normally seen.

 

The National Geographic reports that “Sheldrake did his own study looking at animal reactions before major tremors, including the Northridge, California, quake in 1994, and the Greek and Turkish quakes in 1999.

In all cases, he said, there were reports of peculiar behaviour beforehand, including dogs howling in the night mysteriously, caged birds becoming restless, and cats behaving nervously, vocalising and hiding.”

Japan and the study of whether cats and fish can predict earthquakes

Japan is one of the world’s most earthquake-prone countries. The devastation has caused the loss of many lives and left enormous damage to property. Researchers in Japan have studied animals for a long time to try to discover what they hear or feel before the Earth shakes. They hope to use this knowledge to help predict earthquakes in the future.

Mitsuaki Ota, a professor of veterinary science at Azabu University states that “Electromagnetic waves are emitted before an earthquake happens. Animals have the ability to detect these electromagnetic waves,” Ota says. “Actually, the Thais showed that after last year’s Indian Ocean tsunami caused by an earthquake off the coast of Sumatra that not a single animal was killed by the wave. The only answer I can offer for that is that the animals detected the earthquake and then fled to safety.”

 

Companion Animal psychology has an article discussing animals and the prediction of earthquakes in Japan. They document that “Japanese scientists Hiroyuki Yamauchi et al (2014) conducted an internet survey of pet owners. As well as obtaining demographic information about pets, they asked about any unusual behaviour exhibited in the minutes, hours and days prior to the earthquake. The checklist included things like howling and barking (for dogs), vocalizing (for cats), trembling, being restless, and escaping.

Of those who reported unusual behaviours in dogs, they were most commonly observed immediately prior to the earthquake, in the seconds and minutes before it hit (60% of cases). 16.7% said it happened from 1 to a few hours before. In cats with unusual behaviour, 44.6% showed it immediately prior and 30.4% in the few hours before the earthquake. Some owners reported changes 6 or more days before (6.3% of dogs and 2.9% of cats with unusual behaviour).”

The Japanese continue their studies in the hope that our pets may help us to predict future earthquakes, tsunamis and extreme weather events and in doing so, saves lives.

walking tabby cat

References
Yamauchi, H., Uchiyama, H., Ohtani, N., & Ohta, M. (4). Unusual animal behaviour preceding the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku, Japan: A way to predict the approach of large earthquakes Animals, 131-145
Kirschvink, Joseph L. (2000). Earthquake Prediction by Animals: Evolution and Sensory Perception, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 90, pp. 312-323.
Quammen, D. (1985). Animals and earthquakes: This World, San Francisco Chronicle, April 21, p. 15-16.
Schaal, Rand B. (1988). An Evaluation of the Animal Behaviour Theory for Earthquake Prediction, California Geology, v41, n2.
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cat holds front paw in high-five

Do cats have arms or legs?

Charlie ShortTail

Why do cats have legs and not arms?

Cats generally get around on all four limbs, that is they are quadripeds.

They walk on four limbs or legs. They may be able to walk on two legs, but not as a preference.

Cats have legs; front and hind legs.

Legs are weight bearing limbs for locomotion.

Cats are ‘digitigrades’ that is they walk on their toes (dogs do as well).

The word “arm” refers to a limb that has a hand on the end of it, not a foot. Therefore, again cats have legs not arms.

Do cats have knees?

Cats have knee and elbow joints but not wrists or ankles.

Cats have knees on their back legs and have elbows on their front legs.

Cats have patellas, or kneecaps, on their back legs but not on their front legs, this means two knees and two elbows per cat.

Cats use each leg as if it has both a knee and an elbow though.

Cats do have knees.

black and white cat laying on the ground

Why do cats have paws and not hands or feet?

A paw is defined as something that belongs to an animal not a human.

A paw is the foot of an animal; this can be a fore or hind-foot.

Paws are usually furry and roundish with claws.

Feet are mostly hairless, longish in shape and have nails.

Only people, primates and a minority of creatures have appendages that can be called “hands”.

Cats have paws.

 

 

tabby cat crosses front paws

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Why do female cats screech after mating and attack the male?

Charlie ShortTail

Why do female cats screech during mating?

It is well observed that the female cat will scream, screech or become very aggressive during or just after mating with the tom cat.

The reason for this aggressive behaviour is that the tom cat’s penis has little barbs or spines on it.

When the penis is inserted the spines lay flat, but when withdrawing the penis, the spines cause a raking action on the female’s cat’s vagina, causing pain, and so the female reacts by attacking the male.

Why does the tom cat’s penis have spines?

Female (virgin) cats who have not mated do not ovulate. The pain caused the first time the female cat mates causes shock, initiating the ovulation cycle (this will take a little over 24 hours to actually begin).

The female is then ‘on intense heat’ for around 3 days. A queen may mate as quickly as 30 minutes after the first copulation.

This all explains why the female cat is so angry and tries to swipe the male, and also why the male has to be very careful not to get injured -hence why he holds the female by the neck.

cat with kittens feeding

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Tiny ginger kitten

Images and photos of beautiful cats

Charlie ShortTail


Charlie and cats

Images of beautiful cats:

 

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Abyssinian cat

Abyssinian Cats – all about this beautiful and intelligent breed.

Charlie ShortTail


Origins of the Abyssinian Cat – breed history

Abyssinian cats are thought to have been the direct descendants of the scared Temple cats of ancient Egypt.

Modern cats have been compared to the mummified remains of cats from the tombs and also to the painted frescoes in the tombs and the evidence seems to support this belief.

Soldiers are said to have brought over the cats to Great Britain in the 1860’s on returning from Abyssinia; the popularity of the breed grew quickly.

During the two world wars lack of suitable food and feline leukaemia reduced the numbers severely in the UK.

Abyssinian cats are particularly popular in the United States.

Characteristics of the Abyssinian cat

abyssinian cat sitting up

Abyssinian cats have a long, lithe and slender and natural cat body shape.

They have large, very beautiful eyes which are almond-shaped, in a clear deep shade of amber, green or hazel.

The ears are prominent, erect and set wide apart, well cupped, and furry on their inner edges; ear tufts are desirable.

The tail is long and tapered and the paws are egg-shaped, the head is rounded with medium sized nose. Abyssinans are beautiful and regal cats.

The cats have a rich, golden brown coat (known as ‘usuals’) with a dark brown or black ticking; the tip of the tail is also dark brown or black, the hind legs also being darker, the paw pads are black.

Abyssinians may also have a ruddy, red or blue tinged coat.

In more recent years many other new colours have been introduced to the breed.  These include fawn, chocolate, lilac, sex-linked red and cream, many new silver combinations, and even torties, although at present most of these do not have Championship status.

Common faults in the breed include: stocky body, spots and markings on the body and white upon the neck.

Personality of Abyssinian cats

Intelligent, gentle, inquisitive, very active and agile these cats make lovely companions.

Abyssinians often attach themselves to one member of the family and may take more time than some cats to form bonds with people.

They need a lot of stimulation and benefit from daily play and access to the outdoors. The cats love to climb and need to be able to jump and play; they need attention and may become sullen if they feel neglected.

abyssinian cat face

Care of Abyssinian cats

Daily grooming i.e. rubbing the coat with a gloved hand should be sufficeint.

Pregnant females may need additional care as they remain very active; a litter of three to four kittens is usual. The kittens start life with darker markings which disappear after a few months.

 

abyssinian-cat-lying

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Turkish Van cat showing colours

Turkish Van cat

Charlie ShortTail


Characteristics of the Turkish Van

Turkish Van cats are a rare breed of domestic cat. The cats are handsome, semi-long-haired, gentle, and affectionate, strong, active, curious and healthy. They have brave personalities and show great intelligence. Turkish Van cats will fetch and can be taught to walk on a lead, they often enjoy carrying soft toys around. They enjoy water play, are surprisingly good swimmers and will often bathe quite happily. These cats have a hearty appetite and are not picky eaters; the cats are large and can weigh up to 18 pounds for a male. There are no known genetic diseases with this breed.

Origin of Turkish Vans

Turkish Van cats hail from the Lake Van area of Turkey, a south-east cold region. The cats have a triangular face, small and rounded eyes, and the ears are large, rounded and pink on the inside. Vans have a muscular body structure with legs that look thicker due to the fur and small feet. The cat has a white body with the colour restricted mainly to the tail and head. Turkish Van’s have a beautiful long-haired plumed and coloured tail. The Turkish Van will take up to five years to reach full maturity. Turkish Vans usually only have small litters of around four kittens. The kittens begin with a short coat, which gradually gets longer as the cat matures.

Appearance

The fur is white with red chestnut patches between the eyes and ears and also on the tail, sometimes with lighter and darker alternating red colours. A Turkish Van cat may have blue or amber eyes, or odd coloured eyes. Originally called the “Turkish cat” it was re-named to distinguish it from the Turkish Angora cat. The Van and the Angora cat are distinct breeds that developed in geographically different regions of Turkey. When seen together the cats have different body shapes and characteristics.

Turkish Van cat

Breed standards

Breed standards allow for one or more body spots as long as there is no more than twenty percent colour and the cat does not give the appearance of a bicolour. A few random spots are acceptable, but they should not detract from the pattern; the rest of the cat is white. Although red tabby and white is the classic van colour, the colour on a Van’s head and tail can be one of the following: red, cream, black, blue, red tabby, cream tabby, brown tabby, tortoiseshell, and also other tabby colours. The white spotting gene or piebald gene is why the cats have a random pattern of colour. Common standard faults in the breed include a fully rounded head, markings on the body and underdeveloped musculature.

Grooming

The coat has a very soft and silky ‘cashmere’ like feel and there is no undercoat, so matting is not usually a problem with this breed. The coat is quite water-repellent and will therefore dry quickly. The cats have a winter coat, and then moult to have a shorter, lighter coat in summer. The cats do not need a lot of grooming; although a daily brush with a soft-haired brush will probably be enjoyed by the cat and help prevent knots.

Status of Turkish Van Cats

In 1969 the Turkish Van was given full pedigree status by The Governing Council of the Cat Fancy. The Van began to be imported into America in the 1970s.

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older cat egyptian mau

Dementia in older cats – symptoms, care and treatment

Charlie ShortTail

Dementia in older cats is becoming more common as our pets live longer

Cat dementia (feline cognitive dysfunction syndrome)

As cats start to reach an old age they often become susceptible to both mental and physical problems.

Physical changes can be easier to spot; however mental changes may be a little less obvious.

A cat becomes a senior citizen around the age of 11 or 12 years.

Although older cats don’t get Alzheimer’s disease as such, they can suffer from feline dementia, also known as feline cognitive dysfunction (CDS).

Advancing age in cats often leads to more diseases and disorders, although cats are generally healthier than dogs.

Cognitive dysfunction syndrome (dementia) is a condition that is directly related to the ageing of a cat’s brain.

When the brain is not working normally this can lead to changes in awareness of the surroundings, problems in learning and memory, and decreased responsiveness to stimuli – such as play and interaction with the family. Although the initial symptoms of the disorder are mild, they gradually worsen over time, also known as “cognitive decline.”

prettycat

Symptoms of dementia in senior/ ageing cats

Your cat may have some or most of these symptoms if he or she is suffering from dementia.

  • Confusion or disorientation
  • Anxiety and restlessness
  • Increased irritability
  • Change in personality or character
  • Changes in sleeping patterns
  • Less desire to play
  • Slow to learn new tasks
  • Inability to follow familiar routines
  • Getting lost
  • Lack of self-grooming
  • Faecal and urinary incontinence
  • Apparent disregard for previously learned house rules
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excessive licking

According to an article in the Telegraph newspaper “By Laura Donnelly, Health Correspondent (2008)

“Conditions like Alzheimer’s are becoming increasingly common and now affect one million felines.

Vets have reported seeing an increase of cases but fear that many owners do not pick up on the symptoms because they do not associate the condition with their pets.

As in humans, dementia leaves the animals confused and distressed. The progressive condition, caused by degeneration of the brain, can cause them to get lost more often or become reclusive.

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh now believe half of all cats over the age of 15 and a quarter aged 11 to 14, are suffering from “geriatric onset behavioural problems”.

Dr Danielle Gunn-Moore, professor of feline medicine at the university, said: “When we look at cats of all ages, we believe about 10 per cent will be affected, which represents about one million cats in Britain.”

shorthair cat sleeping

Why are cats getting Dementia?

Just like people cats are living longer, and, as in people they have better diets and have better medical care than in the past so are reaching longer lifespans.

The longer we or cats live the higher the risk of suffering from dementia.

Cats with dementia show the same amyloid protein present in their brains as is found in human dementia suffers. Symptoms may be mild or more concerning.

What are amyloid proteins?

Amyloid proteins and dementia:

Plaques form when protein pieces called beta-amyloid clump together.

Beta-amyloid comes from a larger protein found in the fatty membrane surrounding nerve cells. Beta-amyloid is chemically “sticky” and gradually builds up into plaques.

The most damaging form of beta-amyloid may be groups of a few pieces rather than the plaques themselves. The small clumps may block cell-to-cell signalling at synapses. They may also activate immune system cells that trigger inflammation and devour disabled cells.

Source: Alzheimer’s Association

What age might cats get dementia?

Just as in people, old age in cats doesn’t always mean dementia.

Cats between ages 11 and 14 may show some signs of cognitive dysfunction – changes in behaviour or personality.

In cats 15 and older it is much more common.

However, some medical conditions or behavioural problems unrelated to dementia might show the same signs as dementia, so your vet must exclude these possibilities beforehand.

Abyssinian cat lying down

 

Symptoms of dementia in senior/ ageing cats

Confusion or disorientation in ageing cats

Is your cat may be behaving oddly?

Does your cat seem disoriented or confused? just like people, cats with dementia may not understand familiar settings or may start to get lost when they go out. Your cat may start to stay indoors more.

Is she/ he behaving strangely – staring at walls, forgetting there is food in the dish or perhaps interacting differently with a cat mate that she or he knows well?

Does your cat appear to forget where familiar things are – the cat flap, litter tray, food for instance; this can all lead to stress for your cat.

Anxiety/restlessness

Is your cat pacing around, wandering aimlessly, staring at a wall for no apparent reason?

Your cat may also demand a lot more attention to try to alleviate feelings of anxiety.

Change in personality

A cat’s personality could change from sweet, friendly and loving to become more aggressive, less likely to want to be cuddled or just plain grumpy.

Cats that usually like to cuddle up or love being stroked tend to keep this behaviour throughout their lives. Therefore if your older cat begins to back away from being stroked and starts to become easily irritated, then this may be a sign of cognitive deterioration; with severe cases of dementia a cat may, at times, not recognise you.

lando-green-eyes

Loud meowing and howling behaviour in old cats

Is your cat meowing or howling a lot for no particular reason?

Loud crying at night may be a possible indication of cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS).

Altered sleeping patterns

Instead of sleeping most of the night, your cat may be wandering around the house, often meowing.

Is your cat aimlessly wandering around your home?

Does your cat seem unsettled at night?

Has their usual routine changed?

Sleepy white older cat
sleepy white cat

Loss of appetite

Cats suffering from senile dementia may “forget” to eat. Of course, there are many reasons why a cat could have a decrease in appetite or discontinue eating all together.

You will need to take your cat to see a vet to have other physical problems rules out first.

Not going out/ getting lost

If you have had to go out to find your cat, or neighbours are finding your cat you may be wise to keep your cat confined to your own garden (cat run) or home.

Your cat may alternately be unwilling to go out.

A word of caution though – your cat may just be getting lazier or less tolerant of cold weather; arthritis or joint problems might discourage your cat from outdoor adventures. Kidney disease, brain tumours, deafness and blindness can also cause similar symptoms.

Always consult your vet for advice.

House Soiling

Your cat may urinate or defecate outside of their litter box or exhibit incontinence.

Your cat may be having accidents outside of the litter box, or even just relieving him or herself wherever the cat happens to be such as on a bed or near food areas.

Your cat may forget where the litter tray is; you may need to provide more than one, especially if your cat has access to more than one floor level.

Lack of grooming/ excessive licking.

Your cat may no longer wash and groom him or herself well.

Try to brush your cat each day to help keep their coat in good condition. Brushing may also help maintain a good bond with your cat.

Excessive licking can be a sign of anxiety and stress.

older russian blue cat face

What can I do to help my cat – care of cats with dementia.

If your cat does have dementia, you can do some things to make life easier for him or her and your family.

  • Feeding your cat – stick to a regular routine so they know what to expect and when.
  • Increase the number of food bowls, water dishes and litter trays to make them more accessible from wherever the cat may be in the house.
  • Litter trays should be wide with shallow rims to allow easier access. Keep more than one litter tray if your cats has problems finding the tray.
  • Try to keep their environment unchanged (especially for those cats who may also be blind or deaf) as change creates confusion, which in turn increases anxiety and stress.
  • If changes do need to be made, try to introduce them slowly and gradually.
  • If you have visitors your cat may feel safer being in a different room.
  • A Pet Remedy plug-in or spray can help an anxious cat cope with daily life.
  • Provide several nicely padded and comfortable resting/hiding places throughout the house and again make them easy for your cat to get to.
  • Give your cat the attention and reassurance they seek, but do not fuss too much as they also appreciate time to themselves.
  • Like people, cats need to be stimulated to keep using their brains- play games with your cat, this will also help to keep their impulses sharp.  Activities can include new toys, exercise, and training for new skills – this can all help to improve your cat’s memory and brain function.

Getting the symptoms of dementia diagnosed in ageing cats

For a vet to diagnose dementia symptoms in cat, a full examination will be needed; this includes blood tests, X-rays, hormone level testing and urinalysis.

There is though, the possibility of good news in that your vet might discover a treatable condition, such as hyperthyroidism or diabetes.

Some of the dementia type symptoms might be caused by hearing or vision loss.

Treatment of dementia in cats (felines)

Medication for dementia

Your vet might prescribe medication which aids in combating cognitive dysfunction, such as psychoactive drugs.

Certain supplements, such as vitamin E capsules, might also help, as can prescription anti-anxiety medications.

Never attempt to diagnose or give over the counter medicines yourself – always consult a vet.

Do not buy drugs on the internet and administer them yourself as this could be dangerous for your cat.

Diet Change to help dementia

Your vet will be able to provide recommendations for foods and dietary supplements that promote brain health. They will most likely include the following ingredients, which are all great for cognitive function: antioxidants, vitamins C and E, beta carotene, carnitine, carotenoids, Omega-3, flavonoids, and selenium. As with all supplements the correct dosage is vital as too much of some vitamins can cause adverse reactions.

If you are concerned about your cat always seek professional help from your vet.

Charlie says we all love our old cats…

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tabby cat purring and happy

Healing power of your cats purr

Charlie ShortTail

All about your cat’s purr and how purring helps to heal

Cats don’t just purr when they are happy.

Cats also purr when they are injured, in pain or stressed too…

Cats purr at a ‘healing frequency” (25-150 Hz).

This frequency is therapeutic for:

  • bone growth and healing
  • pain relief
  • swelling reduction
  • wound healing
  • muscle growth and repair
  • tendon repair
  • joint mobility

This might explain why cats generally have better health than dogs and also why they suffer from fewer problems after bone injury.

In people a cats purr can:

  • reduce blood pressure
  • help with mental health problems such as mood.
  • may help with sleep

A cat’s purr also feels, as well as sounds lovely and relaxing…listen to this-

People with pets live longer!

This is only a very brief description of purring and how a cat’s purr can aid healing.

Charlie says high five to the power of cats.

ginger kittens purring
Ginger babies purring whilst napping
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siberian cat in grass

Siberian Cats

Charlie ShortTail



 

All about the beautiful and intelligent Siberian cats

Ancestry of Siberian cats.

Their ancestry can be traced back to 13th century Russia.

The first breed standard was developed in 1987 from the stud ’Roman’.

They arrived in Europe and the USA in the 1990’s, and the UK in 2002.

siberian

Siberian cat – appearance and personality

Siberian cats are gentle giants who take up to 5 years to reach full maturity.

They are similar to the Maine Coon and Norwegian forest cat, however they have a more barrel-shaped body and a wedge-shaped head.

They have gorgeous, bright and slightly almond shaped eyes, in colours from copper through to green. (Blue is allowed only in the Neva Masquerade varieties).

Siberian cats are energetic, inquisitive and love to play; they form strong bonds with people.

They are clever and are sometimes described as ‘dog-like’. They can be taught to walk on a lead and some will also play ‘fetch’.

They need a lot of stimulation, as being so intelligent they can easily get bored; they do well in pairs for company and play.

These cats enjoy being outside and also love water.

Siberian cats have a lovely and impressive purr.

Siberian cat lying down

Siberian cats have beautiful, thick, semi-long coats in over 100 variations of pattern and colour.

They have tufted paw pads and Lynx tips on their ears.

They need daily grooming.

In winter their fur coats grow longer.

Some people who are allergic to cats can tolerate the Siberian cat.

Cost of a Siberian kitten

Kitten cost upwards of £500.00.

Choose a registered and trusted breeder.

The breed is known in some cases to have HCM – hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

To conclude:

Siberian cats make loving and loyal pets.

 

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